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The dream of peace

“Jeremy Corbyn: I was present at wreath-laying but don’t think I was involved”, reports the Guardian.

Jeremy Corbyn said he was present but not involved at a wreath-laying for individuals behind the group that carried out the Munich Olympic massacre, a partial admission that led to a row between him and Israel’s prime minister.

The Labour leader had been asked if Palestinian leaders linked to the Black September terror group were honoured at a memorial event he attended in Tunisia in 2014, at which victims of the 1985 Israeli airstrike in Tunis were remembered.

Corbyn said “a wreath was indeed laid” for “some of those who were killed in Paris in 1992” and added, in response to a question: “I was present at that wreath-laying, I don’t think I was actually involved in it.”

The Guardian picture shows Jeremy accidentally holding a great big wreath.

He added: “I was there because I wanted to see a fitting memorial to everyone who has died in every terrorist incident everywhere because we have to end it. You cannot pursue peace by a cycle of violence; the only way you can pursue peace [is] by a cycle of dialogue.”

32 comments to The dream of peace

  • bobby b

    It’s just like when American Senator Al Franken denied actually touching a woman’s breasts because the picture of him extending his hands to grab them showed air in between his hands and her breasts.

    It’s the ultimate political chutzpah – deny everything which isn’t actually explicitly shown in a picture or video and claim “there’s no proof!” even when it is completely obvious what happened. It gives your supporters the wiggle room of being able to defend you with a semi-straight face.

  • Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker) Gray

    At the same time, you also need to plan your career carefully, these days. Anything you do can be subject to many interpretations. People have phones and cameras everywhere. People seem to think that just because Churchill carried a cigarette, that he smoked. Smoke and Mirrors, people!

  • Vinegar Joe

    Sounds a lot like Bill Clinton: “When I was in England, I experimented with marijuana a time or two, and I didn’t like it, and didn’t inhale, and never tried it again.”

  • James Strong

    Clarification needed.

    Corbyn refers to people ‘killed in Paris in 1992’, but I have read reports that the wreath was for terrorists who murdered Israeli athletes at the Olympics in Munich in 1972.

    Can someone explain?

  • Mr Black

    A communist who lies about his motives, agenda and past actions. So just like all the others then.

  • Pat

    I’m surprised Mr. Corbyn doesn’t make the obvious response- producing evidence of his meetings with Israelis, laying wreaths at the graves of the deceased athletes etc. After all if he was promoting a dialogue he must have been talking to both sides.

  • The point everyone is missing is this may well will win him more votes than it will lose.

  • Penseiveat

    Jeremy Corbyn: “You cannot pursue peace by a cycle of violence; the only way you can pursue peace is by a cycle of dialogue.”
    I trust that this hypocrite has forced these views on Hamas, the IRA, and every other terrorist and fascist organisation he supports and they have agreed with him. This man really is a twonk!

  • Mr Ed

    Well I hope that the Right Honourable Jeremy Corbyn MP gets some balance out there and shows how committed he is to dialogue to stop terror by releasing pictures of him going to funerals of IDF personnel killed in the line of (or off-) duty, and reminds everyone of his fervent support for campaigners against miscarriages of justice like Marine A’s wrongful murder conviction. I daresay that on his many trips to Ireland over the years, Jeremy has been to a few UDA or UFF funerals too, and I’m sure he’s got lots to say, I just wish that he could get his message out there. The right-wing press seem only to be able to find pictures of him consorting with terrorists who hate the West, and that’s all they mention (every now and then).

    Meanwhile, I’m off to get the first ever picture of a Phoenix riding a Unicorn, somewhere just off the Silk Road, I’m told, is the best spot.

  • The Pedant-General

    Re paris 1992 – probably this:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atef_Bseiso

  • Mr Ecks

    Tim Newman is correct

    Which is why the vote needs to removed from Labour’s new, imported voters.

    No migrant of any ethnicity or their kids to get any vote –large or small, local or national –for 100 years.

    Retroactive to 1/1/1997.

    That should do it. And help to stem the future flow.

    PS-An end of postal votes as well.

    Those two moves will make ZaNu unelectable.

    Unless they once again start to give a rat’s arse about the white working class. Which, given how much the middle class Marxian pukes hate the WWC, is highly unlikely.

  • Stonyground

    Labour have never represented the working class during my lifetime. They have always applied policies that made working people poorer. Makes sense really, poor people tend to vote Labour so keeping them poor is a win for them.

  • The point everyone is missing is this may well will win him more votes than it will lose. (Tim Newman, August 14, 2018 at 7:46 am)

    Jeremy Corbyn isn’t forgetting that point. I believe he is quite ‘sincere’ enough in his beliefs that he is not just doing it for the votes – but he knows well the relative importance of each and every faction to whom he owes his place as Labour’s leader, just as they know him well – that’s why they support him.

    Even the beeb seem (though more in what they do not say than what they do) to find this one a bit hard to lean PC on. The clip I caught last night of their coverage of Netenyahu’s comment was astonishingly (by beeb standards!) neutral in tone, noting the unprecedented nature of a foreign leader intervening in what had been a domestic issue – but then adding a “but” referencing “what Jeremy’s Labour critics would say” in defence of Netenyahu’s clearing his throat on the matter.

    (Readers will not need me to point out how that way of presenting it folded in a ‘not all Labour’ subtext. Even so, by UK broadcast standards, such non-framing of Israel is remarkable – so I remark it.)

  • I believe he is quite ‘sincere’ enough in his beliefs that he is not just doing it for the votes – but he knows well the relative importance of each and every faction to whom he owes his place as Labour’s leader, just as they know him well – that’s why they support him.

    Indeed, which is why the calls for him to resign are so pathetic: he’s saying and doing what he believes, and people support him in doing so. The chattering classes would do better to ask why, all of a sudden, Israel and Jew-bashing is rather popular these days.

  • Paul Marks

    In 2017 Mr Jeremy Corbyn said he laid a wreath, there is also a photograph of Mr Corbyn holding a wreath – now he says he does not “think” he was involved in the wreath laying.

    I trust the honestly of Mr Jeremy Corbyn about as much as I trust the honesty of “The Secret Barrister”.

  • pete

    This will probably boost Mr Corbyn’s popularity with some sections of the electorate.

    Naz Shah got a large increase in her majority in Bradford West in 2017, a year after she admitted making anti-Semitic remarks.

    Mr Corbyn promoted her to the shadow cabinet last month.

  • The Pedant-General

    @Tim,

    “which is why the calls for him to resign are so pathetic” I’m not sure. He’s definitely not fit to be the leader of HM loyal opposition let alone PM so, notwithstanding your completely valid point that everyone needs to look at his supporters, he clearly should resign.

    The thing which really galls and really is pathetic are the calls for him to apologise.

  • staghounds

    He won’t even wear a jacket and a necktie to a funeral.

  • Natalie Solent

    James Strong writes,

    Clarification needed.

    Corbyn refers to people ‘killed in Paris in 1992’, but I have read reports that the wreath was for terrorists who murdered Israeli athletes at the Olympics in Munich in 1972.

    Clarification is difficult because Mr Corbyn is so unclear. I don’t know whether that’s by design or not.

    This blog entry by a blogger called “anyabike” is the clearest summary I’ve seen so far. It seems that the monument to the people killed when the Israelis bombed the PLO headquarters in Tunis in 1985 is about 15 yards from where Corbyn was standing. Right next to where he was standing there is a row of four graves. Anyabike writes,

    So where was Corbyn standing when he was pictured holding the wreath? The Mail says he is standing by a plaque that honours three dead men: Salah Khalaf, who founded Black September; Fakhri al-Omari, a key aide of Khalaf’s, and Hayel Abdel-Hamid, PLO chief of security.

    Those three were unquestionably involved in the murder of the Israeli athletes in Munich. According to Palestinian Media Watch (linked to by Anyabike) the Fatah Facebook page even glorifies al-Omari’s involvement with that “operation”.

    The fourth grave is for Atef Bsesio. According to Wikipedia he may or may not have been among the Munich perpetrators. Bsesio is of interest because Corbyn spoke of “people killed in Paris”, and his article in the Communist paper Morning Star says, “After wreaths were laid at the graves of those who died on that day and on the graves of others killed by Mossad agents in Paris in 1991” – and Bsesio was assassinated in Paris by Mossad. But that was in 1992 not 1991 and no one else was assassinated alongside him, so what did Corbyn mean by saying “people” in the plural?

    However three people, plural, were killed in 1991 by Mossad agents. Not in Paris, in Tunis. They were Salah Khalaf, Fakhri al-Omari, and Hayel Abdel-Hamid.

    I want to see someone ask Jeremy Corbyn, “Mr Corbyn, who did you mean by “people killed in Paris”?

  • lucklucky

    “…He’s definitely not fit to be the leader of HM loyal opposition let alone PM…”

    The qulaity of a community moves towards of its journalists…

  • David Bishop

    With McDonnell waiting in the wings, those calling for Corbyn to go might want to be careful what they wish for. There’s appalling and appalling in overdrive …

  • chip

    Seeking the removal of Corbyn is the same thing as banning guns and knives when they’re used to kill or, as a new campaign demands, ban bleach because of the spate of acid attacks.

    Corbyn, knife crime and acid attacks are not changing British society, they are the results of how society has changed. Banning instruments and sweeping odious politicians under the carpet won’t address a problem that is festering at the heart of British culture today.

  • Auralay

    Mr Eks –
    As the British born son of an immigrant (admittedly 60 years before 1997), I find the thought of being stripped of my franchise rather unsettling.
    I do agree with you about postal though. Plus, regrettably, voter ID.
    The boundary reforms should help,too.

  • Runcie Balspune

    You cannot pursue peace by a cycle of violence; the only way you can pursue peace [is] by a cycle of dialogue.

    Corbyn’s groupthink is to examine the “other side” – the violent one – to see what their grievances are, to try and understand why they commit atrocities, to negotiate and reveal to them a better way. This is laudable statesman conduct, and it should be, and a brave man is one who stands with the men of violence and tries to talk them into advancing their cause otherwise, this how he wants to appear, and how he fools his fanboys.

    Unfortunately, when you then voraciously attack the opponents of violence, who are already offering peace, then this doctrine rather falls flat on it’s face.

    The IRA want to destroy the British presence in Northern Ireland, the British want the fighting to stop, the British do not want to destroy the Irish. The Palestinians want to obliterate the Jewish presence in Israel and claim the land for theirs, the Israelis want the fighting to stop, the Israelis do not want to destroy the non-Jewish Palestinians.

    Corbyn’s consistent claim is for a dialogue, but he attacks the sides that offer dialogue – this makes it worse. He follows the tried and trusted leftist tactic; to fool with truths but hide behind the lie that follows that truth. Corbyn talks about peace, freedom, democracy and hard cash, all things we can only agree with, but the hidden lie is his state control doctrine brings more violence to those who divert from the cause, more control of lives by the state, less democracy through restricted outcomes, and less money by increased taxation.

    The man is a master con artist – and unfortunately it is working.

  • Rob

    Evil, lying bastard. Bit strong and abusive, but we have exhausted the rational criticism. He is a stain on public life.

  • Paul Marks

    Mr Corbyn claims he met people because he meets with everyone – because he “wants peace”. However, as Mr Ed and others have pointed out – Mr Corbyn has always refused to meet with the Prime Minister of Israel. So it is clear that the only “peace” Mr Corbyn wants for the Jews is the PEACE OF THE DEAD.

    The allies of Mr Corbyn think that the Jews are capitalist blood suckers, “exploiters” – but how popular is that view with British voters? Is that really how most voters see the Jews – or is in only a minority of people who think in terms of “exploitation” and “Social Justice”?

    Sadly Mr Corbyn and his Comrades may be let into power by the back door – as, if Mrs May remains leader of the Conservative Party, many anti socialist voters may stay home (or vote UKIP) in disgust with the leadership of the Conservative Party.

    As Perry has pointed out more than once – it just is not true that one must support Mrs May or get Comrade Corbyn, on the contrary it is Mrs May who is leading to “Prime Minister Corbyn”. This is one of the many reasons why Mrs May must be replaced – there must be a new leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party.

  • Mr Ed

    I woukd be happy to pay Mr Corbyn’s air fare were he to agree to place a wreath to Black September in a suitably prominent spot in downtown Amman, Jordan.

    Doubtless His Hashemite Majesty would arrange a suitable interview for Mr Corbyn as part of his traditional hospitality to such guests.

  • Flubber

    As David Bishop has noticed Corbyns removal only makes things more complicated.

    John McDonnell is a 24 carat gold plated c#nt.

  • Bilwick

    “You cannot pursue peace by a cycle of violence; the only way you can pursue peace [is] by a cycle of dialogue.”

    You also don’t get peace by advocating coercion, as statists like to do.

  • Schrodinger's Dog

    Jeremy Corbyn said: “You cannot pursue peace by a cycle of violence; the only way you can pursue peace [is] by a cycle of dialogue.”

    So if some racist, far-right group kicked-off in a big way, killing people and blowing things up, he’d negotiate with them?

  • Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker) Gray

    Corbyn, as befits the dedicated lefty, has probably been to lots of memorial meetings! Give him a break for not remembering every one! And in these days of photo-shop and CGI wizardry, how sure are we that the photos are genuine? I distrust journalists AND politicians.
    Q. If you found a politician in the gutter, what should you say?
    A. “How long will you stay out of the sewer, this time?”

  • […] find myself beginning to wonder if it might not be best for the country that he and his see-no-evil “present but not involved” boss Corbyn retain the affections of their student fans in the Labour party for the foreseeable […]