We are developing the social individualist meta-context for the future. From the very serious to the extremely frivolous... lets see what is on the mind of the Samizdata people.

Samizdata, derived from Samizdat /n. - a system of clandestine publication of banned literature in the USSR [Russ.,= self-publishing house]

Be not afraid… on second thoughts, be afraid. It pays better.

The Metro reports,

NHS receptionist handed £56,000 after being sacked for being afraid of patients

A receptionist at an NHS clinic who was petrified of patients was wrongfully dismissed, a tribunal found.

Sacramenta D’Silva received £56,684 in compensation from Croydon Health Service NHS Trust.

She suffered from public phobia and told managers at the trust’s chest clinic, which she joined in 2003, that she only wanted to work in a back office booking appointments.

But her bosses said her role was public-facing.

Related: “Everyone’s a winner”, a post from last year about another public sector worker who won big at an employment tribunal.

9 comments to Be not afraid… on second thoughts, be afraid. It pays better.

  • The money should come directly out of the pockets of the HR staff member who employed her.

  • Stonyground

    I wonder if such people have trouble finding a job after something like this. I’ve often been asked to do jobs that were different to the one that I was originally employed for. I like variety and learning new things, I just got stuck in and made myself useful and didn’t get fired.

  • APL

    Stonyground: “I wonder if such people have trouble finding a job after something like this.”

    1. Not in the public sector.
    2. She’s a protected minority, so if they turn her down, they’d likely get sued too.

  • Peter MacFarlane

    From the linked article: “…she went on sick leave in March 2017 and never returned to work…”

    This also is normal procedure in the public sector.

    Sometime they come back for a week or so, so as to “earn” another two or three years off on full pay – but it’s not really required.

  • john in cheshire

    I hope she’s using that money to protect herself from fears of walking down the street.
    Perhaps she’d be feel safer in another country.

  • Paul Marks

    These laws are insane – but no one has the courage to get rid of them.

    When politicians ask about them (and it takes a brave politician even to ask) they are told the laws are in line with “international policy”.

    No Parliament can bind future Parliaments – what (for example) John Major agreed in 1992 (Agenda 21 – most likely without even looking at it) has no legal force if Parliament today says it has no legal force.

    Throw all this “international policy” into the fire.

    “But we can not allow employers to hire and fire subject only to Common Law contract”.

    YES WE CAN – if we have the political will to get rid of the insane regulations. If we have the political will to tell the “international community” and “enlightened liberal opinion” to GO TO HELL.

  • She’s a protected minority, so if [a company she applied to were to] turn her down, they’d likely get sued too. (APL, June 24, 2021 at 11:23 am)

    As with smoking, so with hiring the whining, the best way to stop is never to start. While you are right that explicitly refusing her on those grounds would be dangerous, she may find that someone else gets hired for many a job she seeks.

    As the US government once ruled that ‘Japanese women’ were “too few to constitute a minority group”, so the category of those who find their clients too terrifying to serve, though just the sort to be individually flattered by tribunals, may fall below the politicised radar that gets quotas assigned.

  • From the linked article: “…she went on sick leave in March 2017 and never returned to work…” (Peter MacFarlane, June 24, 2021 at 11:31 am)

    I chance to know that, around the millenium, it was huge news in the Stoke-on-Trent government valuation office that someone had been fired – not from that office but from another valuation office far away.

    It was something to do with the dismissed man having spent less than six months putting in even the slightest appearance of doing any work during his 10 years of being paid by them.

    It caused a great stir because no-one could recall the previous time when anyone had ever been sacked from any of the UK’s many valuation offices.

    There was considerable vagueness as to the details of his medical condition – except for the detail that any attempt to work did seem to bring on a swift relapse.

  • Katy Hibbert

    If this oxygen-thief – probably a diverstity hire – had even managed to get a job in the private sector, she would not have lasted a minute. The idea that we should all sacrifice civil liberties so that the bloated, sclerotic, lavishly overpaid and mostly useless NHS should not be “overwhelmed” is beyond ludicrous.

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