We are developing the social individualist meta-context for the future. From the very serious to the extremely frivolous... lets see what is on the mind of the Samizdata people.

Samizdata, derived from Samizdat /n. - a system of clandestine publication of banned literature in the USSR [Russ.,= self-publishing house]

Samizdata quote of the day

British companies, pension funds may have to report climate risks – Did you vote Tory thinking this is what you were supporting? Keep that in mind next time you are tempted to vote for the people doing this

– Perry de Havilland, commenting on this.

21 comments to Samizdata quote of the day

  • mickc

    It is interesting that the country with the best ever climate change policy was always criticised as being in breach of “human rights”.
    That country was China with its “one child only” policy. Fewer people, less pollution, less demand for resources….what could be more simple?

  • pete

    What about councils? My local council preaches to us about saving the planet by acting in an environmentally responsible way.

    Meanwhile it co-owns the local airport with the other 9 boroughs in the area, and makes a fat profit from it as it continues its never ending expansion.

  • Rich Rostrom

    The “climate change” panic is a scam, to be sure, but ISTM that this is an extension of normal fiduciary responsibility. I can think of a number of areas where fiduciary actors should be required to assess long-term risks – many of which would be politically incorrect. (Risk to the business from demographic change; from the costs of “climate change” programs; from family breakdowns due to “feminism”; from Chinese economic imperialism; from SJW mob-atttacks.)

  • Snorri Godhi

    What i’d like to know is how people such as the Samizdata Illuminatus get to know what Perry says. Presumably it is not on the web, and it can hardly be a personal communication if the Illuminatus is located in Massachusetts.

  • Samizdata Illuminatus

    That is because we sinister illuminati see all 😛

    Plus quite a lot of the samizdatistas hang out drinking strange cocktails at each other’s homes & eating in the same curry joints in London.

  • bobby b

    “What i’d like to know is how people such as the Samizdata Illuminatus get to know what Perry says.”

    Follow him on Twitter.

  • Bulldog Drumond

    But which came first, the tweet or the blog?

  • Julie near Chicago

    So what I want to know, why roosters have combs and wattles? :>)

  • Gavin Longmuir

    People should pay a lot of attention to Perry. He is one of the very few Brits out there who recognize what is obvious to the outsider — the day after Brexit, a lot of doughty Brexiteers are going to wake up and realize that the guys in charge are still fully paid-up members of the Davoise — the same kind of Oxbridge, metropolitan, BBC-approved under-performers who got the UK into the EU in the first place.

    Paul Marks prefers the term “independence” to Brexit. Old timers in the US will still tell any of the youngsters who will listen that high school students used to be taught the US had to fight for independence three separate times. The War of Independence was only the first. Brexit will only be the beginning, not the end. It remains to be seen if enough Brits have the stomach for the subsequent huge effort required to win their real independence from their own Political Class.

  • bobby b

    As I head out now to the big South Dakota Fourth of July clan* gathering, with too many fireworks and too much food and fun, here’s hoping all y’all over there get to celebrate your own Independence Day soon.

    On top of the more obvious benefits, it makes for awesome yearly parties.

    (* – To whatever extent Norwegians, Swedes, Finns and Germans can have clans.)

  • People should pay a lot of attention to Perry.

    I strongly support that sentiment 😉 But to be honest, sometimes I don’t even pay attention to myself.

    He is one of the very few Brits out there who recognize what is obvious to the outsider — the day after Brexit, a lot of doughty Brexiteers are going to wake up and realize that the guys in charge are still fully paid-up members of the Davoise

    Not convinced I am quite as rare as you think, what with the Brexit Party now being the single biggest party in the EU ‘Parliament’ (EU-wide, not just UK 😀 ). I think quite a few people have got the message that the rot goes deep and wide. I am of the view that a great realignment is coming.

  • Mr. Caligari

    I see a lots of references to popper here. Why not just think in a ‘Critical rationalist’ way?

    It’s not that you get a gouverment you like but the opportunity to change it. Thats the point.
    If you’re British and have a problem with this, okay – go ahead and vote a new gouverment. Its your choice.

    Please consider, in countries like Germany or in the EU, you would not have this choice. In Germony (and into the EU) a “great coalition” is in Power. Transfered in british respects, this would be mean that the Tory and Labour party would rule together.
    You can trully vote whatever you want – but you’ll get the same resulte, no matters the conservativs or the lefties win.

    Not convinced I am quite as rare as you think, what with the Brexit Party now being the single biggest party in the EU ‘Parliament’ (EU-wide, not just UK 😀 ).

    Conservatives lead in all European affairs. That does not seem to make it any better.

    Thats the great thing about British democracy.

  • Fred Z

    We have carefully assessed the “climate risks” to this corporation and its shareholders. They are utter bollocks. Fuck off.

    We have carefully assessed the “political risks” to this corporation and its shareholders from lefty arsehole commie pricks. They are substantial. We are therefore declaring a special dividend of one assault, marine, infantry or automatic weapon and 1000 rounds of ammunition to every shareholder, regardless of the number of shares held. The shareholders may elect to receive that old reliable AK-47, the upstart AR-15 and its variants, or a selection of Teuto-British weapons, such as H & K, Mauser 1000, MG-42, Schmeisser, Enfield, Sten, Bren et al. See the corporate webpage “killthefuckingcommies.rightwingco.com/choices”.

    Now remember lads and lassies, self defence only. Broadly defined.

  • Itellyounothing

    Perry is not alone. He is perhaps an early adopter…..

    1642, 1688, 1914 to 1918 delivered the conscription / universal suffrage

    1973 to 1975 stealth win for the Establishment.

    2016 to 20XX for the current round.

    No doubt there are more….

  • People should pay a lot of attention to Perry. He is one of the very few Brits out there who recognize what is obvious to the outsider

    Not convinced I am quite as rare as you think

    My samizdata memories (FWIW) are as follows.

    Even in the end-June 2016 week when we expected Boris would be the next Tory leader, we expected improvements rather than solutions short-term. We were prepared to be disappointed by Boris – just a lot less so than by any realistic alternative PM from inside or outside the Tory party. (And we were in a forgiving mood, being on the high of victory.)

    After the Tories chose May as leader, I think it was very clear to many on this blog that there would be major work to do post-Brexit – Brexit would only make it more possible.

    However, very few indeed predicted back in summer 2016 that May would make April fools of us in April 2019. Of commenters around here in 2016, only staghounds predicted that – and because staghounds predicted it immediately after the brexitref, i.e. before Gove destroyed Boris’ chance of getting a country-party leadership vote, I never felt staghounds actually predicted it as such. Only after Gove’s weirdness happened did it become possible for the Tory establishment to suppressed a non-parliamentary-party vote for leader and shuffle in May, so, to my mind only after that surprising action by Gove did it become more a prediction (for which the far-sighted can take credit) than a cynical speculation (which is sometimes proved correct by events and sometimes proved wrong). Our enemies were powerful and motivated and contemptuous of us, as staghounds said, but they also needed a bit of luck. (Having made that objection, I should repeat that staghounds alone said it back then, and was much disagreed with, and 33 months later it was so, so staghounds has all credit that properly belongs to that.)

    Fortunately, our enemies have squandered their luck. Instead of a Brexit leaving them mostly still in place (to, as Gavin suggests, resist all our freedom-oriented hopes), they now risk a more thorough purge. The will to push through Brexit by Halloween has united people whom it would have taken us a decade (or forever) to unite in a push for “free speech now” or whatever. Our enemies did not imitate the reed so now there is a chance they will imitate the oak, and come crashing down. Awareness on samizdata of this possibility began when May offered her deal, and Boris and Davis resigned, and slowly grew as each successive compromise was refused by a stubborn establishment (and/or May – whether and when they in part disagreed was not always obvious). I had it very much in mind by the time I inflicted another of my poetic offerings on the long-suffering prose stylists of samizdata. 🙂

    If that happens, it will indeed have been precisely Brexit that inflicted a major reverse on the establishment. Sometimes you need a precise datable thing, and a name for it (even if one that really annoys Paul 🙂 ) to get freedom moving.

    The 13 colonies would still have had lots of issues (in themselves and with the British government) if the latter had decided to repeal the tea tax. But the British government repealed all the others and left the tea tax – for the principle of the thing. Similarly our political class said that ‘Brexit means Brexit’ – but they won’t leave the EU without the EU’s permission (without a deal, as they put it).

  • Gavin Longmuir

    Niall K: … I think it was very clear to many on this blog that there would be major work to do post-Brexit – Brexit would only make it more possible.”

    What the outsider sees is countless words spilled over Brexit in the cold civil war between deeply divided Brits, but almost nothing about what follows Brexit — apart from inane remarks about the sunlit uplands of freedom. No proposals, no agendas about the “major work to do post-Brexit”, no serious debate, no emerging consensus.

    In the meantime, of the 17 million Brits who voted Leave in the referendum 3 years ago (and the 29 million British citizens who did not), only 6 million bothered to cast a ballot (not even a no-fuss postal ballot) for the Brexit Party in the recent EU elections. And there is still no debate over how the UK should best act to take advantage of its future new status following separation from the EU.

    Sadly, a gambling man would be more likely to put money on Brexit being followed by the slough of despond instead of by the sunlit uplands of freedom. Really, it is long past time for doughty Brexiteers to start laying the groundwork for the tough fights which will follow separation if the UK is really going to shake off the kind of misguided rule (Conservative as well as Labour) which (as PdeH points out) takes the climate change scam seriously.

  • Rich Rostrom

    Gavin Longmuir – July 2, 2019 at 8:44 pm

    Old timers in the US will still tell any of the youngsters who will listen that high school students used to be taught the US had to fight for independence three separate times. The War of Independence was only the first.

    ????

    When I was in high school, 50 years ago, I heard no such thing, Nor have I ever read or heard it, from “old-timers” or in old books or films.

    What were these two later occasions?

    The War of 1812 was initiated by the US; no one seriously contends that Britain had any intent or desire to re-conquer the US.

    World War II? The US went to war to defend other nations against Germany (and Japan), in the belief that Germany was a long term threat to the US.

    The Cold War? That ended only 30 years ago, far too recently for such an evaluation to be remembered only by “old-timers”,

    Seriously, what two occasions are intended here?

  • Gavin Longmuir

    Maybe you are not old enough, Rich? 🙂 Or maybe you did not go to school in Texas, in the days before our Far-Left educational establishment branded the US the evil aggressor in every war ever fought?

    I did not go to school in Texas either, so you are getting it second hand from a Texas old-timer. And I heard this from the old-timer years ago, so I beg your indulgence for any inaccuracies in my memory. I think the three occasions the US had to fight for its independence were the war against the Brits (War of Independence), then the mainly naval war with the French around the time of the French Revolution, followed by war with the Brits again in the war of 1812 — during which those peace-loving Brits put armies on American soil and burned down the White House. But you knew that. Some have argued that, if the war had gone better for the Brits, a then still-expansionary British Empire would have been happy to bring those chastened colonists back into the fold.

    Bog-standard “progressive” academic historians would undoubtedly put a very different (and strongly anti-US) spin on all of those conflicts. But don’t let this historical analogy distract from the indisputable point — Brexit is the beginning, not the end. And those doughty Brexiteers seem mostly to be rather unprepared for what lies ahead.

  • George

    > I am of the view that a great realignment is coming.

    Mr. de Havilland is surely correct there, in that the fall of western civilisation qualifies as a great realignment. So I don’t understand why he should strain at the gnat of some silly regulation.

  • the fall of western civilisation qualifies as a great realignment

    Yeah whatever. I do not share your pessimism.

  • Itellyounothing

    Even if the odds are poor, despair is absolutely pointless.

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