We are developing the social individualist meta-context for the future. From the very serious to the extremely frivolous... lets see what is on the mind of the Samizdata people.

Samizdata, derived from Samizdat /n. - a system of clandestine publication of banned literature in the USSR [Russ.,= self-publishing house]

The law will find you eventually, evildoer (bin crime edition)

I was arrested & thrown in cell by cops for putting rubbish bags next to my bins EIGHT YEARS ago – the Sun.

A MUM-of-two claims she was arrested and thrown in a cell by police for putting rubbish bags next to her bins eight years ago.

Heather Underwood says she was “shaken” when cops came knocking with a warrant on Thursday morning over the 2014 incident.

The 32-year-old was taken to a custody suite where she was told she had left several black bags next to the bins at her old house.

She was then kept in a locked cell for four hours before finally being told the case had been discontinued.

The charge was for fly-tipping, but Ms Underwood says that at that time in 2014 she had only just moved into the property and found the bins already filled by the previous tenants, so she put her own rubbish in bags next to them. It never occurred to her that this was not allowed, let alone an offence that would be pursued for eight years.

Who is the Inspector Javert of Knutton, Staffordshire? Surely their devotion to duty should be recognised.

There, out in the darkness
A fugitive running
Fallen from God
Fallen from grace
God be my witness
I never shall yield
‘Til we come face to face
‘Til we come face to face

Unless… the Sun did let slip that this lady works as an OnlyFans model. I very much hope that had nothing to do with the police pulling her in.

“The most degrading part of it was when I had to use the bathroom and the toilet just had a glass window, I didn’t even have any privacy.”

14 comments to The law will find you eventually, evildoer (bin crime edition)

  • Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker) Gray

    It’s hard to believe that these aren’t Monty Python sketches! At least, if we had time travel, we could be arrested when we commit the offence….. Had to stop- some future cops warned me about what I was about to write, which would have offended someone in the future. Also, I will need to get a license before making new jokes…

  • Peter MacFarlane

    No time or resources to apprehend burglars or shoplifters, but plenty for stuff like this or checking on mean tweets.

    Sickening.

  • Penseivat

    I bet Inspector Javert took home, and kept, a Police issued pen several years ago, as a more junior officer. Lock him/her/they/it up and throw away the key!
    No wonder the public no longer think well, or respect, the Police.

  • William H. Stoddard

    “Did you really think that we want those laws to be observed?” said Dr. Ferris. “We want them broken . . . We’re after power and we mean it . . . There’s no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren’t enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. Who wants a nation of law-abiding citizens? What’s there in that for anyone? But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced nor objectively interpreted—and you create a nation of law-breakers—and then you cash in on guilt.”

    (Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged)

    From the ongoing economic collapse to the rule of resentful nonentities to the crucial role of nonobjective law, our era is making Rand look increasingly prophetic.

  • Fraser Orr

    @stoddard that was exactly the quote I was thinking of when I read this; thanks for pulling it up in full.

    In fairness it seems her crime was failure to respond to a summons rather than the actual infraction. Nonetheless it does seem a bit outrageous. Disobeying the proper authorities is, after all, a crime without equal.

    However, weep not for the lovely Ms. Underwood. No doubt a front page story in the Sun accompanied by her sexy pics will see her huge following of 200 in onlyfans jump to quite a bit larger. One might well think that getting busted by the plod is the best thing that ever happened to her.

  • But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced nor objectively interpreted—and you create a nation of law-breakers—and then you cash in on guilt.

    The problem with that approach is that after a while the guilt evaporates and the law is wholly held in contempt by everyone other than the lawmakers and the enforcers.

    Indeed to such an extent that a form of common-law vigilantism appears, so that where murderers have escaped justice because of their family or political connections, they mysteriously end up cutting their own heads off while combing their hair.

    Ultimately though, the power of the law is only as good as its enforcement and when even the police hate and fear the tyranny of the laws that are imposed then open rebellion and civil war are the only answer.

    What country before ever existed a century and half without a rebellion? And what country can preserve it’s liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is it’s natural manure.

    Thomas Jefferson, In a 1787 letter to William Stephens Smith, the son-in-law of John Adams

  • bobby b

    “The problem with that approach is that after a while the guilt evaporates and the law is wholly held in contempt by everyone other than the lawmakers and the enforcers.”

    I used to be as pro-police as one could hope to be, defending them and supporting them for doing the necessary things that the rest of us feel too virtuous to do.

    But the type of person that used to become a cop must now look elsewhere for employment. I sure don’t see many of them anymore.

    Imagine taking that job knowing you will be arresting people who dare go maskless, that you will be running along a deserted beach trying to catch someone breaking quarantine, that you will be dragging woman off to jail for eight-year-old tipping charges such as these, or that you will be kneeling to BLM.

    From heroes to woke hall monitors in half a generation.

  • Imagine taking that job knowing you will be arresting people who dare go maskless

    Unless they are the masked brigades of Antifa/BLM which must be allowed to express their outrage with fire and violence while police watch on, their only instruction being to prevent their intervention by ordinary folks wishing to keep peace and order or prevent their properties from burning.

    Q.V. Portland and Seattle these last few years.

  • Subotai Bahadur

    It is interesting, on this anniversary of our Declaration of Independence, to think of those former colonies which left peacefully, and of Britain itself.

    Of course in Britain we have felony fly-tipping and as mentioned a bunch of other wastes of time designed to keep people subservient.

    In Canada, their Charter of Rights and Freedoms only holds if it does not inconvenience or annoy the Prime Minister, as we have seen and are seeing.

    In Australia and New Zealand, if the government wants, you go into a camp.

    Now I note that our own American Federal Government has people in solitary confinement, uncharged and without legal representation for a year and a half. But at least a major portion of our people know that it is unconstitutional and is an abomination. I suspect that there will be a reckoning someday, which will not happen in those colonies that left Britain peacefully.

    Subotai Bahadur

  • William H. Stoddard

    Subotai: Yeah, C and I have talked about other countries we might emigrate to if things get harsh in the US. But all of the other English-speaking countries seem already authoritarian.

  • Pat

    It seems there are a lot of people who are liable to be charged with wasting police time- including a lot of policemen.

  • Paul Marks

    The vast bureaucracy is strangling itself with its own red tape – but it will strangle the ordinary citizens, such as this lady, first.

  • Fraser Orr

    @William H. Stoddard
    Subotai: Yeah, C and I have talked about other countries we might emigrate to if things get harsh in the US. But all of the other English-speaking countries seem already authoritarian.

    That is true, but other countries have things like lower taxes, less blather about white guilt, much less rioting and much less of the superior, supercilious attitude. I moved the the US from the the UK because it was much more friendly toward entrepreneurs. I don’t think that is true any more. I think the general attitude of soak the rich, success is built on the backs of stealing from the poor, white guilt and all the other things make it a very hostile place now. I definitely think there are now better places than the US.

    Some obvious examples would be Singapore and Dubai. And if you are willing to learn Spanish, Panama, Costa Rica and Puerto Rico (which, although sort of American, is actually the only place in the world where an American can legally avoid paying US Federal Taxes.)

    And I’m not sure what you mean by “if things get harsh in the US”. Aren’t they already?

  • Nicholas (Still Unlicensed Joker) Gray

    I would like to know why some people think that Australia is authoritarian, and that the government can just put you into a camp, if it wants. I see no evidence of that.

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>