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Putting the apparatus of repression into place

The European Court has dispelled any residual doubt that it is little more than a politically motivated tool of the European Commission and continues its slow but steady construction of the means to make investigative journalism impossible in Brussels by ruling that Belgian police could seize Hans-Martin Tillack‘s computers and records to identify his sources regarding reports on EU corruption.

The Euro-court has made little attempt to hide that is has colluded with EU political interests in a judgement that cuts to the heart of journalists ability to report on wrong doing and corruption by politicians.

Euro-judges accepted commission claims that it played no role in the arrest of Mr Tillack, even though leaked anti-fraud office documents show it orchestrated the raid from the beginning.

Whistleblowing will not be tolerated. The superstate is not your friend.

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39 comments to Putting the apparatus of repression into place

  • GCooper

    Yes, indeed! Buried among all the Beckham/Blair/Kerry/Bush flim-flam, this is one of the most chilling stories to have emerged in months: and it has been lost in all that noise. To at least some degree quite deliberately, I suspect.

    Our ancestors fought and died for rights which are being tossed away almost daily by both the EU and our own indolent, corrupt and ignorant parliament, as if they were mere scraps of paper.

    Roll-up, roll-up! See the British public sleepwalk over the cliff edge! Remember to tell your grandchildren how much more important football seemed than the actions of a traitor like Neil Kinnock, who sold his country for a worthless job and a handsome pension.

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: Perry de Havilland
    RE: You Guys…

    ….are beginning to sound like Years 2 and 3 of Babylon 5, with the seizure of power by the Clark administration, backed by the Psi Corps.

    Good luck. You’re gonna need it.

    Regards,

    Chuck(le)

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: GCooper
    RE: Sounds Like…

    “…rights which are being tossed away almost daily by both the EU and our own indolent, corrupt and ignorant parliament, as if they were mere scraps of paper.

    Roll-up, roll-up! See the British public sleepwalk over the cliff edge!” — GCooper

    …the fall of the Roman Republic; corrupt and lazy Senators unwilling to make the hard decisions, hoping that tomorrow the crisis of the moment will have all blown away, confused and ignorant plebians with little idea of what’s going on around them.

    All you’ll need is a strong-man to come in and bring order out of the chaos.

    And, according to ancient legend, you’ll have him, soon enough. [Note: But you won’t have the weapons to withstand him very well, now, will you….]

    Enjoy,

    Chuck(le)

  • Rob

    Wow! Sounds like the Soviet Union is re-emerging in leftist Europe. Gee, never saw that coming…

  • Guy Herbert

    And as for undercover journalism like this, whether you like it or not, you can forget it once they get the ID system working. The inner workings of the state will be further hidden. And probably unaccountable anyway. Europol officers are to be made immune from the criminal law in the performance of their duties. I doubt they will be the last officials to be so privileged.

  • We’re not quite sure if we have the latin correct but to update Cato:
    Ceterum censeo Consilium Europaeum esse delendam
    http://timworstall.typepad.com/timworstall/2004/10/latin_you_can_u.html

  • Julian Morrison

    Seperation of powers. Seperate executive and judiciary. UK has it, USA has it, Europe doesn’t. That’s the conclusion I draw from this and related stories. In other words, it’s a mistake to grant this court the respect one gives to lawmen. This is a “star chamber”, a political court which rules as it’s instructed.

  • Pete_London

    Tim

    Cato’s famous and oft repeated quote was Carthago delenda est! (“Carthage must be destroyed!”)

    Presumably you then mean Consilium Europaeum delenda est!

    Correct or not I can only endorse the sentiment.

  • Nice reference Chuck. Trouble is where is Ivanova?

    This is a pretty vile development. Guess that means the Sprout is going to be far more careful than in the past.

  • Pete,
    Yes, the short form of the phrase is indeed “Carthago Delenda Est” meaning Carthage must be destroyed.
    The longer form translates as” therefore I conclude that Carthage must be destroyed” and that’s the form we’ve tried to go with. Still not sure that we have the correct translation for “European Union” but we’re working on it. Anyone who actually knows (like someone who listens to the finnish news radio in latin?) please contact me.

  • Will America once again have to rescue Europe?

  • EK

    Direct Discourse: Europae consilium delendum est
    Indirect: Europae consilium delendum esse

  • Kristopher

    Will America once again have to rescue Europe?

    Posted by Robert Speirs at October 19, 2004 01:50 PM

    No, no, no!

    IngSoc has always been allied to Eurasia!

    The 30 minute hate for Oceania begins at 9:00 AM tomorrow.

  • kbarrett

    Will America once again have to rescue Europe?

    Posted by Robert Speirs at October 19, 2004 01:50 PM

    No, no, no!

    IngSoc has always been allied to Eurasia!

    The 30 minute hate for Oceania begins at 9:00 AM tomorrow.

  • John Ellis

    Robert S:

    Will America once again have to rescue Europe?

    God, you guys can never get over that “here comes the cavalry” complex, can you….?

    You were late for the First One (and only came in ‘cos you citizens and ships were being sunk) and you were late for the Second One (and only came in ‘cos the Japs attacked you and Hitler declared war on YOU to show solidarity with them).

    Preserve me from self righteous Yanks!

    And much as I hate the EU model and its bureaucrats, I would take them over Bush and Rummie any day. Thanks but NO THANKS. Stay away.

    (Forgive me for any intemperance, but I’m feeling intemperate as I’ve had a few this afternoon. You were probably only being sarcastic. However, it was such a fine rant I have decided to post it anyway. “In vino veritas”, as Latin is the flavour of the day…)

  • Checked with the EU Latin translation office (yes, they have one) and they regard themselves as “Unio Europaea”.

  • snide

    John Ellis thinks Bush and Rummie has more impact on his life that the EU? Sweet Jesus, what an twit.

    And speaking of twits, yeah, Robert Speirs might as well have “Please flame me, I am the archetypal Insulting American” on this forehead.

  • John Ellis

    No, snide, I accept that the EU has a (mostly malign) effect on my life – I just don’t want to swap King Log for King Stork. Ie I don’t want the American model that RS seems to be offering to “save” us poor benighted Euros.

  • John Ellis

    …and snide, I’m sure you didn’t want to reduce this discussion to an exchange of insults, so I will refrain from responding to the “an twit” remark – either about its sentiment or its spelling….

  • veryretired

    You don’t have to worry about the US bothering to come to Europe’s “rescue” again. You’ve spent most of the past several centuries slaughtering each other, with the 20th century being your crowning achievement. 100 million, or more, wasn’t it?

    It is very obvious to most in the US that you just aren’t worth the trouble. In case you don’t remember, a lot of our families came here to get away from Europe and its lunacy in the first place.

  • Pete_London

    Can I come too?

  • John Ellis

    veryretired….

    Good. I hope RS adopts your attitude.

    As for slaughtering though, the US involvement in WW1 and WW2, the activity in Vietnam, and more recent events hardly exonerate the guys on your side of the pond for all bad stuff.

    Ultimately, you’re all Europeans as you note (except for the Native Americans you wiped out), so you’re tarred with our genocidal brush. No moral superiority worth mentioning, I should say…

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: Andrew Ian Dodge
    RE: Where Indeed?

    “Nice reference Chuck. Trouble is where is Ivanova?” — AID

    Not to mention kryptic Kosh, or the reborn Delenn.

    But who needs them when you’ve got the likes of Clark, the Psi Corps and the Shadows to play with?

    Regards,

    Chuck(le)

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: John Ellis
    RE: Yeah…

    “You were late for the First One (and only came in ‘cos you citizens and ships were being sunk) and you were late for the Second One (and only came in ‘cos the Japs attacked you and Hitler declared war on YOU to show solidarity with them).” — John Ellis

    …so what are you complaining about when you say,

    “Preserve me from self righteous Yanks!

    And much as I hate the EU model and its bureaucrats, I would take them over Bush and Rummie any day. Thanks but NO THANKS. Stay away.”

    As, according to your excellent report of historical precedence, we only show up when you guys are in some REALLY DEEP KIMCHEE and you’re begging US for help.

    You can have your contemporary Il Duce/Das Fuhrer, if you prefer that. But somehow, I think you’ll not enjoy it.

    Regards,

    Chuck(le)
    [History does not repeat itself. It has a speech impediment. It stutters.]

  • veryretired

    Childish multi-culti nonsense. You must have been the best in your freshman class.

    Hard to show genocide when there are more people of Native descent now than there were when the Europeans (who were responsible for most of the killing) landed.

    The US has had the miserable task of cleaning up the messes left behind by the collapse of the various European empires over the last century or so. If you are ever in a real history class, not Propaganda 101, check out the Spanish, Portugeuse, French, Dutch, Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and British Empires.

    As they dissolved into chaos and revolution, easy prey for our buddies with the Marxist playbooks and lots of AK’s, guess who had the only viable military with which to counter the spread of that utterly European brand of totalitarian collectivism?

    With the notable exception of the British, in certain instances, being able to leave behind reasonably functioning democratic systems, the legacy of Europe in the world is one of repression, racism, collectivism, corruption, slavery, and chaos.

    If Europe hadn’t produced some remarkable artists, writers, musicians, and chefs, there’s be a bounty on the lot of you in most areas of the world. The next time the President of France is tongue kissing Robert Mugabe at some state meeting, ask yourself about moral superiority again.

    But, anyway, good luck with your classes. I know that sophomore year can be rough. It must be hard to concentrate on studying when you already know everything.

  • diablo blanco

    This arguement stinks of racism and statism. No nation or government has a monopoly on trampling the rights of its people or on behaving rationally once in a while. Seriously, I can read garbage comments like this on LGF. I’ve come to expect a higher caliber of discussion from you guys and this thread frankly surprises me.

  • Cobden Bright

    “the legacy of Europe in the world is one of repression, racism, collectivism, corruption, slavery, and chaos.”

    Bear in mind that the same terms describe the US in various portions of its history. Racism goes without saying. Collectivism is clearly entrenched in today’s America, with taxes at over 1/3 of GDP. Corruption is an American hallmark – vote early and vote often. Slavery was the very foundation of the American Republic, with many of the drafters of the constitution being slave-owners. Chaos certainly described the original colonisation of the west, the civil war, and the brutal annexation of the Phillippines in which 300,000 natives were killed by American forces.

    As diablo states, the idea that the US is some kind of moral saint is absurd on its face. All powerful nations, throughout history, have committed atrocities and abuses on both their own populations and against foreign countries.

    Have you not considered that your own statement, condeming an entire continent for the actions of a tiny handful of politicians, might not itself be absurdly collectivist? Besides, Switzerland is in Europe and is far less guilty of any of the crimes you list than is the United States government.

  • veryretired

    It is always amazing to run into travellers from an alternate universe. There is no claim of perfection in anything posted above. If you would like to live in a world crafted by the political theories put into practice by the leading lights of Europe, take your pick—

    Napoleonic Imperium?

    Prussian Militarism?

    Russian Autocracy?

    Italian Fascism?

    German Nazism?

    British Raj?

    Russian Marxism?

    Scandenavian Socialism?

    If you want to criticize the US, go right ahead. We’re very used to it by now. Just don’t pout so hard when some of it comes back your way.

    Although, I must admit, you do look awful cute when your lip quivers and you stomp your little feet. Does it make you feel better?

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: veryretired
    RE: Don’t Forget…

    “If you would like to live in a world crafted by the political theories put into practice by the leading lights of Europe, take your pick—” — veryretired

    …the wonderful new form the Europeans are crafting for them now. The one this topical thread is about in the first place.

    TO: Cobden Bright et al
    RE: All I Can Say Is…

    …Vaya con Dios, compadre.

    Regards,

    Chuck(le)

  • The Last Toryboy

    I think you’ll find that Locke came from Europe, so you seem happy enough with at least one European political theory.

    And as for the Raj, I think I’d rather be an Indian under the Viceroy than a Filipino circa 1910. The USA’s brief flirtation with imperialism makes for pretty ugly reading.

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: The Last Tory Boy
    RE: Only…

    “And as for the Raj, I think I’d rather be an Indian under the Viceroy than a Filipino circa 1910.” — The Last Tory Boy

    …if you were a Moro, compadre. And stupid enough to take on the US Army in drug-crazed beserker mode.

    I think that business of dipping the bullets in pigs blood was very effective. And considerably more humane than having one’s head sawed off with a dull knife, without benefit of pain-killers or anesthesia.

    Don’t you think?

    Regards,

    Chuck(le)

  • Wow. Eurofascism? I wonder whether Jeremy Rifkin mentions this in his new book, The European Dream? (People are pushing him as a Kerry cabinet member, you know….)

  • Johnathan

    Back on the original subject of the post (can we please try and steer away from the usual transatlantic pissing contests?), stories like this explain the recent impact of the UKIP in British elections. The Tories have been hammered because they don’t realise how much the EU is now hated among a significant chunk of voters. They have been told by the chattering classes that anti-EU sentiment is vulgar, “suburban” and reactionary, no doubt fearing that they may lose the crucial Guardian vote if they ramp up the anti-EU rhetoric.

    My worry about Tory leader, Michael Howard, is that given his authortarian track record while Home Secretary, he will not be up to the task of hammering the EU on the civil liberties front, although you never know.

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: Johnathan
    RE: Yeah?

    From the sounds of it, your Parliment sounds like a latter-day Roman Republic Senate to me; unwilling and unable to do what is required of it in preventing the tyranny it can see coming at it.

    And your so-called major media, nothing more than what we’ve got over here on this side of the big pond; a biased propaganda machine whose interests do not include the Republic.

    Just finished the part about where Ceasar, when he was Counsel, has Cato, his chief opponent in the Romand Senate, arrested on the Senate floor for opposing his initiatives. Very interesting stuff. It basically marks the end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the rule of the “strong man”. And the Senate didn’t have the gumption to react to it as it should have.

    We’ll see it again, in the EU. As we saw it in the Weimer Republic and the Provisional Government (Russia 1917). And it will lead to similarly messy end.

    Regards,

    Chuck(le)
    [If history repeats itself, and the unexpected always happens, how incapable must Man be of learning from experience! — George Bernard Shaw]

  • Naw, the Moro rebellion was a bit later than 1910, and they were Muslims.

    Between 250,000 and 1 million Filipinos died due to US army scorched earth tactics throughout the whole insurrection. I figure “If it’s dead and its not white, its a Moro?”.

    Not that I care. The UK has done the same. As Bomber Harris said, “The only thing the Arab understands is the heavy hand…”
    But when things like this are mixed with obnoxiously holier-than-thou attitudes it gets up my nose.

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: The Last Tory Boy
    RE: Got…

    “Between 250,000 and 1 million Filipinos died due to US army scorched earth tactics throughout the whole insurrection. I figure “If it’s dead and its not white, its a Moro?”.” — the Last Tory Boy

    …a citation? A reference? Preferably credible. I’ll be out of studying Ceasar in a couple of weeks. I’ll need something new to read.

    Regards,

    Chuck(le)

  • All sorts about it if you look…

    http://www.historyguy.com/PhilipineAmericanwar.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_Insurrection

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macario_Sacay

    …and doubtless much more besides can be unearthed with Google. Don’t know any worthy books on the topic, I notice a few websites have sources and bibliographies listed though.

  • Seem as good as any other…

    1. Agoncillo, Theodoro. History of the Filipino People. Garotech Publishing, Quezon City, 1990.

    2. Davis, Paul. Encyclopedia of Invasions and Conquests. W. W. Norton & Co.: New York, 1996.

    3. Eggenberger, David. An Encyclopedia of Battles: Accounts of Over 1,560 Battles from 1479 B.C. to the Present. Dover Publications Inc., New York, 1985.

  • Chuck Pelto

    TO: The Last Tory Boy
    RE: Info Sources

    Thanks….I’ll look at em.

    Regards,

    Chuck(le)