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Now there is a sight I will never get tired of seeing…

Now there is a sight I will never get tired of seeing. Better late than never!

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11 comments to Now there is a sight I will never get tired of seeing…

  • Mr Ed

    97 years too late, but they got there.

  • Borys Hrytsenko

    97 years late, but not too late.

  • Paul Marks

    Agreed Perry – and the fact that the pro Putin side honours (rather than pulling down) statues of Lenin and other criminals tells me all I need to know about them.

  • Woo hoo. Wish I was there to cheer.

  • They could have gotten good money for it selling it to any of several U.S. university Economics departments.

  • Nick (Natural Genius) Gray

    Maybe this can be a Ukrainian sport- Lenin-toppling!? Make it annually, and they’ll stay alert to their neighbour’s imperious nature.

  • Laird

    Here in the States we have the sport of cow-tipping. “Lenin-tipping” would seem to be the eastern European version.

  • Rob

    I was wondering why there was a black border on the Guardian this morning.

  • ragingnick

    Of course it’s always heartening to see images exalting communist thugs being eradicated, but in Ukraine itself I do not think that The toppling of or dancing around such statues has anything much to do with the celebration of repudiation of Bolshevism and of Lenin the flesh and blood man.

    Images often transcend their historical referents, and in a grand historical irony the statues of Lenin dotted around Russia and Ukraine have become less symbols of Bolshevism than of old fashioned Russian nationalism. This is why it is a mistake to automatically assume that those dancing around such statues are communist thugs.

  • Michael Jennings (London)

    One of the more bizarre things I have seen in recent months is footage of people waving Russian Orthodox Christian flags and other symbols while protecting communist era statues and such. Deeply weird given that the communists were atheists. Less so when you consider that the Orthodox Church and Communism are both now seen as ways of asserting Russian nationalism.