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A new Canterbury tale

While I’m linking to what is probably common knowledge here at Samizdata, let me throw in a link to Iowahawk’s new Canterbury Tale for Bishop Rowan. In the unlikely event you haven’t seen this already, you really, really owe it to yourself to click through.

Just a little taste:

41 Sayth the libertine, “’tis well and goode

42 But sharia goes now where nae it should;

43 I liketh bigge buttes and I cannot lye,

44 You othere faelows can’t denye,

45 But the council closed my wenching pub,

46 To please the Imams, aye thaere’s the rub.”

10 comments to A new Canterbury tale

  • WalterBoswell

    T’is well humorous, oh one and all
    Sir Iowahawk, hys on the ball

  • I read the whole thing, and ’twas fine. But to be properly multi-culti, line 101 should say “Myanmar”.

  • Nick M

    Brilliant.

    Iowahawk is American?

    Hats off to him because he seems to know the British vernacular (both C21st and Medieval) rather well.

  • YogSothoth

    Iowahawk is American?

    Hats off to him because he seems to know the British vernacular (both C21st and Medieval) rather well.

    Certainly looks that way …

  • mike

    Yep – read that very piece earlier this afternoon – if only the Archbishop himself could read it – ha! what a laugh that would be!

  • Kirk Parker

    Dr. Ellen,

    OK, so to what address do I send you the bill for a thorough monitor-cleaning? :-)

  • R C Dean

    Iowahawk is American?

    About as American as they come (lives in Iowa, obsessed by vintage hot rods) and probably the premier humorist currently practicing on this side of the pond.

  • David

    Mr Burge has outdone himself. This had me laughing out loud in my cubicle.

  • Cthulhu

    “You are old, father William,” the young man said,
    “And your hair has become very white;
    And yet you incessantly stand on your head–
    Do you think, at your age, it is right?”

    “In my youth,” father William replied to his son,
    “I feared it might injure the brain;
    But, now that I’m perfectly sure I have none,
    Why, I do it again and again.”

    — Lewis Carroll

  • Sunfish

    I guess this was written when Sir Mix-a-Lot was Squire Mix-a-lot?