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Want to see Ayn Rand’s ‘Atlas Shrugged: Either-Or’?

From 130 reviews on Yahoo! Movies, ‘Atlas Shrugged: Either-Or’ scores an average of four out of five.

It hasn’t been shown in Britain, but I am thinking of organising a screening in central London. Would you come? Let me know if you’re interested.

19 comments to Want to see Ayn Rand’s ‘Atlas Shrugged: Either-Or’?

  • Perry Metzger

    General consensus even from objectivist friends who are crazy fans of the book was that the movie sucked. One actually walked out halfway through. Caveat spectator.

  • Have a look at the reviews on Yahoo! Movies – there are some people who didn’t like it, but the average rating is high.

  • Dale Amon

    I loved it.

  • Andy

    Where can I see the first film?

  • The first one was awful. I’d be interested in seing this one though, and have signed up.

  • Laird

    The first one is available through Netflix, if you’re a subscriber.

  • bloke in spain

    Having once attempted to read the book, I think I’d opt for anaesthetised root canal work as entertainment.

  • bloke in spain

    I do apologize. I think my spellchecker may have implied Ayn Rand an unwarranted good review. I was sure I typed ‘unanaethetised’.

  • Laird

    Well, Bloke, I’ve read the book several times and I liked the first movie OK (not great, but adequate). De gustibus non est disputandum and all that.

  • Johnathan Pearce

    I saw it in California over a month ago. I thought it was pretty good, and I am a fan, up to a point, of Rand and her general philosophy.

    The guy who played Rearden was excellent, as was F. D’Ancona’s actor. I wasn’t quite convinced by the lady who played Dagny, however.

  • bloke in spain

    All I can say, laird, a little wordy for my taste.

    But seriously folks…….

    Look, I’d cheerfully self describe as a libertarian, although possibly a bit more of an aggressive libertarian than some might have a stomach for, But I can’t really get the hots for a book libertarian intellectuals may enjoy feeding their confirmation biases with. Maybe it’ll convert a few from the other side but, as intellectuals usually have their minds pretty well made up, I doubt it. Nor give a flying f**k to be honest. The libertarianism I’m interested in is the libertarianism of the estates & inner cities because I’m much more interested in offering freedom to the ordinary geezer & geezeress than a bunch of middle class graduates. Why? Maybe I’d actually like to see a libertarian society happen rather than be an intellectual exercise. That’s going to take some sort of revolution & when it comes down to bodies on the barricades & swinging politicians from short lengths of rope, the one thing you can count on intellectuals is you can’t.
    So movies? Shame Joss Stone never got the dosh to make more Firefly. Series or the film. That’s the message I like. Liberty’s something you fight for, not talk about. You might even get laid if you’re lucky. And it’s action not words because whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword wasn’t looking at three feet of sharp steel

  • So movies? Shame Joss Stone never got the dosh to make more Firefly. Series or the film. That’s the message I like. Liberty’s something you fight for, not talk about.

    Must say I am pretty much of the same view as BiS really :D

  • Harry Powell

    The Man In The White Suit pretty much said everything Rand had to say, but better.

  • bloke in spain

    Just to add to something I said in the above & to emphasize a point.
    I truly do feel very uncomfortable about & don’t trust intellectual libertarianism. If you won’t walk the walk, why talk the talk? And I see very little sign of intellectual libertarians actually doing anything to create liberty.

    It’s got a horrible flavour of intellectual socialism about it. A lot of theorising but an expectation it’s some other poor sod gotta go out & do it. And it’ll end up going the same way. The poor sods who get a few benefits but pay a helluva price. And an officer class who get more benefits to add to the ones they already have, but risk very little. And if it doesn’t quite work out according to theory? Never mind, We’ll all sit around drinking fine wines & fine tuning our theories until we find some more mugs & isn’t that Comrade So’n’So over there from the communists. How you doing, old boy. Join us in a tipple?

  • I truly do feel very uncomfortable about & don’t trust intellectual libertarianism. If you won’t walk the walk, why talk the talk? And I see very little sign of intellectual libertarians actually doing anything to create liberty.

    As opposed to….?

    Please point me at the Great Unwashed Beer Drinking Instinctual Libertarian Movement so I can join up, BiS.

  • Laird

    BiS, I agree with you about Firefly (although it was by Joss Whedon, not Joss Stone).

    As to “wordy”, no argument there. But then I also like Neal Stephenson’s books, so wordiness doesn’t bother me much.

  • bloke in spain

    “Please point me at the Great Unwashed Beer Drinking Instinctual Libertarian Movement so I can join up,”

    You & me both, Perry.

    But in a sense it does exist, is all around you & you can join it if you wish. There’s lots of people don’t like the system & do the best they can to baulk it. They often end up in court for their troubles. You want to join? Next time you’re affected by a law you don’t agree with, break it. You just joined. Sorry. You won’t get a membership card. Or a T-shirt.
    Intrusive, oppressive laws only work if enough people obey them. The people who actually run the State are quite few & their agents limited in numbers. The whole shitheap relies on consent. Withdraw it.

  • bloke in spain

    Looks like I got smited permanently, that time. C’est la vie.

    Yeah, not the blonde bint, she’s better legs.

    That Neal Stephenson as in Snow Crash or some writer of gotos to transubstantiationalism I’ve never heard of?
    If is. Wordy? For a small value of but very readable. Coincidentally, just downloaded some NS, including SC, for Xmas* insurance.
    Cyberpunk’s been a big influence. Especially Gibson** The idea of living in the interstices of the greater society. Not a bad blueprint for emergent practical libertarianism

    *Actually for the other one. Starts this Thursday. Not Catholic so haven’t the vaguest. Survive those, we’ve got 3 Kings. Maybe I’ll find a blonde with a decent pair.
    **There’s a guy can write. Pack a helluva lot of meaning in a few words. But a shame how, with the death of CRTs a “television sky” will so quickly lose all meaning.

  • Even late generation CRT TVs do not give you the “dead channel” effect that Gibson was talking about. Mostly, if the signal is non-existent or too weak to be useful, they default to showing a consistent bright blue screen. So, “The sky was the color of a television tuned to a dead channel”. Which is bright blue, a totally unremarkable colour for the sky.