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Life in California

Oh my. I am laughing. It is an American New Year’s Day tradition to watch the Tournament of Roses Parade. The granddaddy and the best of all American parades, the Rose parade is even older (1890) than the Rose Bowl game (1902).

The floats are the most strictly regulated of any parade and all of them deserve prizes for genuine awesomeness but still, there is unmistakable ‘all must have prizes’ going on. One of those prizes is awarded by the governor of California. It is awarded to the parade float “that best represents life in California.” This year the winner is the Sierra Madre association float. It is very beautiful to look at.

One small problem. It broke down. It blocked up the parade route and needed a tow truck to move. While it apparently does happen from time to time, I’ve never before seen a Tournament of Roses Parade float behind a tow truck. And there goes the float “that best represents life in California” being dragged down the parade route behind a tow truck. Like Bernie, dead but still going through the motions. Someone has posted some video.

As they say, “you couldn’t make it up.”

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9 comments to Life in California

  • K

    The local LA TV station announcer Bob Eubanks noted over the air the appropriateness of the tow truck with the “Life in California” float.

    As an aside, California may still make it because there’s a stealth bailout going on. The “stimulus” money has kicked in and a large number of freeways are now clogged with traffic as they are being worked on at federal taxpayer expense, something which the state government has refused to do for 20 years.

  • Midwesterner

    I guess that would cast us non-Californians in the role of Larry and Richard, moving Bernie’s limbs to conceal his death.

  • RAB

    Good to see you posting again Mid. Nothing like a bit of ironic humour to start the new Year with. Things are looking up already!

  • We’re all Californians now.

    BTW, is Bernie really dead?

  • jack

    Am I not the first one to notice that that a “float which best represents California” having to be bailed out of break down by a third party is one hell of an accurate metaphor? I guess the builders added that realistic detail in on purpose, just to drive the representation home to everyone.

  • Well duh

    Am I not the first one to notice that that a “float which best represents California” having to be bailed out of break down by a third party is one hell of an accurate metaphor?

    Apparently not, Jack – it was pretty much the main point of Midwesterner’s post. But keep those insights coming.

  • C.A.T.

    There is another level of ironry to this that non Californian’s may not have appreciated.

    It is apparently very PC in California to award the top prize at such events to anything that honours California’s Mexican heritage.

    Due to the number of “newly arrived from Mexico with no money” who get nearly dead cars, there are a lot of jokes about Mexican’s pushing cars that don’t run. For example : “How do you stop a Mexican tank in battle? – Shoot the guys pushing it!”

    It took a local to point this out to a Brit, who thought it merely as straightforward an allegory as the Seal of the Office of the President falling off Obama’s lectern.

    I am indebted to E.M. Smith, The Chiefio who has helped push his fair share of dead cars for this extra level of understanding and additional laughs.

  • Bod

    Next up, a Formula One racing car sponsored by Durex.

    In the pit-stop with a puncture.

  • Preston

    Or, “Who are the most popular guests at a Mexican wedding?” “The guys with the jumper cables.” (By the way, these are not usually new arrivals, not by several generations.)